Project 2

From That Moment Onwards…

 

Project 2 – Visual Skills

 

Exercise 1.2 – Point

Brief

Take three or four photographs in which a single point is placed in different parts of the frame. When composing the shots use these three rules: the place of the point shouldn’t
be too obvious (such as right in the middle), the composition should hold a tension and be balanced (the golden section or rule of thirds) and the point should be easy to see. Evaluate the shots according to these rules and select which one you think works best.

Then take a few more shots without any rules, just being aware of the relationship of the point to the frame. Without the rules, how can you evaluate the shots? That will be a key question throughout the whole degree programme.

Add the photographs to your learning log together with brief observations.

 

Initial Response

Although this brief seems to be challenging, I think it will help build my confidence on the framing of photos and using a main focal point in a photo. Using rules and being asked to take photos in certain ways, will help to showcase and to push my abilities to comply with these rules.

 

Artist Annotation

I have done some research on an artist I discovered when researching in depth about the rule of thirds. You can see my research in the research section on my website. Although you can check out some annotations I did of his work here: Jim Zuckerman

 

Mind Map

Here you can see some quick thoughts of mine for my shoot: Mind Map Visual Skills 1.2 Point

 

Shoot Plan

For this shoot, I thought of certain objects I could use or find whilst out and about to do this shoot with. In the end, I settled with using an ornament of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. The reason why I chose this as the object in the images is because It will stand out as it won’t fit the surroundings within the frame. Although it will stand out, hopefully it won’t look ridiculous. I just want the object to be clear enough so that it can be seen when being moved around the frame. I am going outside to do this shoot, but I am not certain on a location, one place I feel would be good for this shoot is my garden. It has lots of different areas of plants, concreate and furniture which will also bring out lots of texture and colour within the image.

 

Shoot

 

Image 1 – With Rules

IMG_0611

 

Image 2 – With Rules

IMG_0607

 

Image 3 – With Rules

IMG_0612

 

Image 4 – Without Rules

IMG_0620

 

Image 5 – Without Rules

IMG_0617

 

Image 6 – Without Rules

IMG_0616

 

Aperture, ISO, Shutter Speed

Image 1,3,4,5,6:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 800
Shutter Speed: 1/160

Image 2:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 640
Shutter Speed: 1/160

 

Annotations

Open the document below to get my analysis on this shoot.

Annotations- Point

 

Reflection

There are a few points that I feel I could have done better on in this exercise. For example, I feel that I struggled with trying to apply the brief with my own ideas and I was unsure whether the ornament worked in my favour or not. The images were not my best images, but I feel that I have learnt something from this exercise and a technique that I can use in my future work, even if I think I didn’t execute it as well as I could have.
The location in my own garden, I thought was a good idea because there was plenty to play with in the foreground, mid ground and background and I felt you could clearly see that the image could be divided up into those sections.
If I was to expand on this exercise I would revisit the same location with a smaller object and play around with the positioning more.
I could have done this shoot with a bigger object or I could have moved the camera in relation to the object to still comply with these rules which could’ve be interesting because if I move the camera instead of the object this will give a slightly different background each time instead of a fixed background like I did in this shoot. If there was less going on in the image and you could only focus on one object with space all around it, then that could be a shoot that might be worth a try also.

 

Exercise 1.3 – Line

 

Brief

Take a number of shots using lines to create a sense of depth. Shooting with a wide- angle lens (zooming out) strengthens a diagonal line by giving it more length within the frame. The effect is dramatically accentuated if you choose a viewpoint close to the line.

Now take a number of shots using lines to flatten the pictorial space. To avoid the effects of perspective, the sensor/film plane should be parallel to the subject and you may like to try a high viewpoint (i.e. looking down). Modern architecture offers strong lines and dynamic diagonals, and zooming in can help to create simpler, more abstract compositions.

Review your shots from both parts of Exercise 1.3. How do the different lines relate to the frame? There’s an important difference from the point exercises: a line can leave the frame. For perpendicular lines this doesn’t seem to disrupt the composition too much, but for perspective lines the eye travels quickly along the diagonal and straight out of the picture. It feels uncomfortable because the eye seems to have no way back into the picture except the point that it started from. So another ‘rule’ of photography is that ‘leading lines’ should lead somewhere within the frame.

 

Initial Response

For the first part of the brief, after I read it, it really made me think about lines and the use of lines in photography and the thought of lines leading the eye. I think the brief will give me certain challenges that I am bound to come up against, which will hopefully help me learn more about lines within photography.

 

The second part of the brief took me a while to get my head around and made me really think of what I could shoot to comply with the brief. I struggled to think of any high view points as I live in a place where there is nothing to climb high up, or to climb at all to get a real decent shot in relation to the task. Like the previous briefs I am excited to get started, I have studied Moholy-Nagy before so I am aware of his work, and what a good artist he was.

 

Shoot 1

 

Mind Map

For the first part of this exercise, you can see some ideas that I am going to try for this shoot. You can check it out here: Mind Map 1.3 Line pt1

 

Artist Annotation

For this exercise, I did some research into Eugene Atget and annotated some images of his. You can check it out here: Eugene Atget

 

Shoot Plan

For this first shoot to do with line, I am going to try to emulate Atget’s work in terms of working with diagonal lines. For this shoot I am going to look for fences and unusual things that comply with this brief and try to execute a shoot in the same manner and to see what the outcome is like. Hopefully I can get some sort of shoot that works and clearly demonstrates the same style as Atget’s work.

 

Contact Sheet

Click the link to view the contact sheet. Contact Sheet

Contact Sheet Annotation

Here you can see a brief reasoning behind why I have chosen the select images for my shoot: Contact Sheet Annotation 1

Shoot 1

 

Image 1

2

 

Image 2

1

 

Image 3

3

 

Image 4

4

 

Aperture, ISO, Shutter Speed

Image 1:

Aperture: 4.5
ISO: 100
Shutter Speed: 1/200

Image 2:

Aperture: 8.0
ISO: 125
Shutter Speed: 1/160

Image 3:

Aperture: 8.0
ISO: 200
Shutter Speed: 1/160

Image 4:

Aperture: 8.0
ISO: 3200
Shutter Speed: 1/125

 

Annotations

Here you can see what I have to say about my images in depth: Annotations 1

Shoot 2

 

Mind Map

Please click the link to see my mind map for my second shoot: Mind Map 1.3 Line pt2

 

Artist Annotation

Here you can view my annotations for Moholy-Nagy: Moholy-Nagy

 

Shoot 2 Plan

In this shoot I am going to try and find a high vantage point in which I can work with to take photos looking down to emulate the style of Moholy-Nagy. I think this shoot will be challenging but I am going to make sure my photos are abstract and are in relation to the brief. For this shoot I am thinking of going down to the local train station and doing it of the railway line as I feel this would be an interesting shoot. I think this will be an interesting shoot because of all the lines and patterns I will encounter from the tracks.

 

Contact Sheet

To view the contact sheet, click the link. Contact Sheet 2

 

Contact Sheet Annotation

Here is my annotations of the contact sheet: Contact Sheet Annotation 2

Shoot 2

 

Image 1

2

 

Image 2

1

 

Image 3

3

 

Image 4

4

Aperture, ISO, Shutter Speed

Image 1:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 400
Shutter Speed: 1/125

Image 2:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 250
Shutter Speed: 1/125

Image 3:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 400
Shutter Speed: 1/125

Image 4:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 400
Shutter Speed: 1/125

 

Annotations

Click on the link for my thoughts on this shoot: Annotation 2

 

Reflection

Over these past two shoots I feel that I have understood the brief and I think that I have applied my knowledge and skills well in terms of taking similar images to the ones presented in the brief.  I think that my annotations for the images could have been made stronger by expanding my vocabulary and trying to put my ideas in my head onto the word document better so I can get across what I am really thinking.
The first shoot went well for the diagonal lines and I learnt that it does lead your eye and really made me think about what I was doing when taking the picture and how I was setting it up to do what was stated in the brief.
In my second shoot, the railway, the lines were everywhere and there were many patterns in the images and I feel I produced some interesting pictures for the exercise. If I was to do a shoot again for this exercise I would try somewhere higher up and with buildings as I think there is only so much you can do with the railway line.

I found that the lines in the first shoot lead your eye into the frame, to the centre, making it unconfutable for the eye and having to restart from where it originally started from. In the second shoot the lines seemed to lead your eye out of the frame and then back in on a different line as there were so many different lines within the frame. Both of the exercises made your eye go different ways because of the positioning of the lines and this seems strange. If I told you that lines in a photo could make your eye view it differently, you would probably seem confused, but the fact is that lines within an image have different affects depending on where the lines are leading.

In the first shoot it would have been good to do something that was unusual instead of fences and railings. Different like roads or anything with lines generally that could have made for a more unique shoot.  If I do a shoot such as this again, I would take this into consideration for different content in my images.

The railway shoot was fun. I feel this brings a different term to ‘abstract’ as it is usually associated with modern buildings these days. Because they’re only tracks, I reckon there is only a certain amount you can do with them. If I was to refine this shoot and to expand my photography, choosing a higher vantage point with buildings or roads underneath would be a good idea.

 

 

Exercise 1.4 – Frame

 

Brief

 

The final exercise of this project makes use of the viewfinder grid display of a digital camera. This function projects a grid onto the viewfinder screen to help align vertical and horizontal lines, such as the horizon or the edge of a building, with the edge of the frame. Please check your camera manual (or Google search) for how to display the grid in your viewfinder. If your camera doesn’t have a grid display, just imagine a simple division of the viewfinder into four sections.

Take a good number of shots, composing each shot within a single section of the viewfinder grid. Don’t bother about the rest of the frame! Use any combination of grid section, subject and viewpoint you choose.

When you review the shots evaluate the whole frame not just the part you’ve composed. Looking at a frame calmly and without hurry may eventually reveal a visual coalescence, a ‘gestalt’.

Select six or eight images that you feel work both individually and as a set and present them as a single composite image. Add to your learning log together with technical information such as camera settings and two or three lines containing your thoughts and observations.

 

 

Initial Response

After reading the brief to this exercise, I couldn’t help but think that it seemed slightly similar to Exercise 1.2 – Point. I managed to find the viewfinder display on my camera right away. I’m glad that my camera had this option as it is much easier having it visually, rather than having to imagine it! This brief is fascinating and hopefully my photographs will produce what is expected in the brief.

I feel that the viewfinder grid display could be a useful tool for future work and photography in general when composing a shot.

 

Mind Map

Please click on the link to view my mind map which brainstorms initial thoughts before drawing up a shoot plan: Mind Map – Frame

 

Artist Annotation

Here I have annotated a couple of images from Walker Evans. The reason I have annotated his images, is to give a breakdown of his work so I can think about certain aspects to use in my photography to help expand my style for this shoot and further projects. Walker Evans

 

Shoot Plan

For this shoot I am going to take it outside within my garden. The reason for this is because the weather has been pretty bad recently and it keeps raining so I do not want to travel far afield for this shoot. I will have to do it when there is a break in the weather. There are many objects in my garden that I can use for the viewfinder grid and to get the same results wherever I may do the shoot. For this shoot I will be using various settings and will be trying to get shots that comply with the task and to get the results intended. The photos may not look spectacular but hopefully will be able to use the viewfinder grid as demonstrated in the brief.

 

Contact Sheet

Please click the link to view my contact sheet for this shoot. Contact Sheet 3

Contact Sheet Annotation

I have explained my reasons for selecting certain images in my Contact Sheet Annotations 1.4. You can read it here: Contact Sheet Annotation 3

 

Shoot

 

Image 1

1

Image 2

2

Image 3

3

Image 4

4

Image 5

5

Image 6

6

Photo Grid

12

Aperture, ISO, Shutter Speed

Image 1:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 200
Shutter Speed: 1/20

Image 2:

Aperture: 5.6
ISO: 320
Shutter Speed: 1/20

Image 3:

Aperture: 9.0
ISO: 100
Shutter Speed: 1/20

Image 4:

Aperture: 9.0
ISO: 500
Shutter Speed: 1/20

Image 5:

Aperture: 9.0
ISO: 250
Shutter Speed: 1/20

Image 6:

Aperture: 16.0
ISO: 4000
Shutter Speed: 1/25

 

 

Annotations

Here I have annotated my final images, talking about the whole of the picture and how I found the viewfinder grid: Exercise 1.4 Annotations

 

Reflection

For 1.4 Frame, I found the exercise very helpful and have gained knowledge in the viewfinder grid and how to utilise it. I had fun doing the shoot and thought I produced some half decent images. When I annotated them, I felt that when talking about my images, I gave myself an insight further into my own work instead of just saying ‘here is my images’ I realised that some of my images contained significant things that I missed myself when composing the image. 

Sometimes the viewfinder can really help when shooting an image as when you place your subject in that square it can really help map out the rest of the shot. I think some squares worked better than others and in the top 6 of my final images, a few were in roughly the same place. I recognised this because I feel that some of the other positions didn’t work as well and didn’t push my work or make it sit together as a series and didn’t show my ability with my photography. Although I did choose a selection from the images as I have written in my annotations how I feel some of the images do not work as well as some of the other positions and why. 

I think that most of the 6 images came out really well and used a good range of colour, angles, shapes and patterns and textures and still managed to be uniform because they were all hanging subjects. 

If I was to re do this exercise I would focus more specifically on the same subject but using different areas of the grid to see what makes the best shot with the same subject and background, just aimed differently within the frame in each shot. 

Overall, I feel that this exercise was needed and it was a good exercise to include in the degree to help with the framing of photos and good tool to establish yourself well with to help with future images when out on shoots.

Bibliography

Bibliography

© Lewis.Gibson.Photography.2019

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